Connecticut Contractor Licenses

Contractors engaged in home improvement and new home construction need licenses, but the requirements for licenses don’t stop there. The rules in the state are fairly elaborate, which is why we have put together the article below to help you get an understanding of the landscape.

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Connecticut Contractor’s License Board

When it comes to registering as a contractor in the state of Connecticut, this is generally handled by the state’s Department of Consumer Protection. This is also applicable for all other occupational licenses that are related to construction work, as well as any other jobs related to home improvement.

Skilled workers are required by the state to obtain their licenses from the Department. This can be acquired by submitting your application to the department, although some licenses also require you to take and pass the exams. Contractors, on the other hand, are not required to be licensed but only to be registered with the state. It is a must for specific contractors and skilled workers to obtain Connecticut-issued licenses or be registered with the state before they can place a bid and work on construction projects anywhere in the state.

Application forms for license applications and contractor registrations can also be found online. You may also request a copy of the required forms by going to office of the Department of Consumer Protection, which is located at 450 Columbus Boulevard, Suite 901, Hartford, Connecticut 06103-1840. They have a self-serve walk-in center where you can get the necessary forms, as well as drop your application forms and other required documents. It is only open on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and it is not staffed, so questions about the license and registration processes can be directed to the Department by calling 860-713-6135 or by sending an email to dcp.licenseservices@ct.gov.

The state also allows prequalified contractors to bid on projects that are under the state’s Department of Transportation, including bridges, railroads, earthworks, traffic control and illumination, roadway subsurface and surface treatment, incidental construction, and vertical construction, among others. You can apply for these projects by contacting the State of Connecticut’s Department of Transportation at 2800 Berlin Turnpike, P. O. Box 317546, Newington, CT 06131-7546 and by calling them at (860) 594-3123.

Out-of-state corporations who want to work on projects in Connecticut are also required to obtain their Certificate of Authority for Out-of-State Corporations. This is issued by Connecticut’s Secretary of State and you can apply for it by contacting the office at 30 Trinity Street, Hartford, CT 06106. You can also call them at (860) 509-6002. Online applications can also be made through this website: http://www.sots.ct.gov/sots/cwp/view.asp?a=3177&q=392124.

How to Get a Contractor’s license in Connecticut and Its Advantages

Both contractors and skilled workers are required to either be registered or licensed by the state of Connecticut. The application processes, as well as the respective requirements, vary depending on the type of license or registration being applied for.

If you want to register or apply for any license in Connecticut, you can do so online at https://www.elicense.ct.gov/. Applying online allows you to pay for your application using your credit card. Otherwise, you can only pay through money order or check. Note that all fees are non-refundable.

You can also apply for any license on the basis of equivalent training or experience. To do so, you must provide copies of your academic records or diploma that is related to the type of license you are applying for, as well as notarized statements from your previous and current employers in the related field that indicate the duties of your employment with their corresponding dates.

If you are applying for a driller, journeyperson, or technician license, you are required to submit an original copy of your Letter of Apprenticeship Completion Certificate that has been issued by the Apprenticeship Training Division of the state’s Department of Labor. You can request a copy by going to www.ctapprenticeship.com or calling (860) 263-6085.

For the dealer-technician and contractor licenses, you must be a licensed journeyperson, driller, or technician for a minimum of two years before you can apply for this license. Your license must be connected to the contractor or dealer-technician license you are applying for. Together with your application form, you need to submit a photocopy of your valid license.

Application fees for the license applications, unless specifically stated, generally cost $150 for contractors, $90 for journeypersons, $200 for dealer-technicians, $80 for technicians, and $88 for drillers. If you are paying through money order or check, make sure that it is also made payable to the ‘Treasurer, State of Connecticut.’ The examination fees will depend on your license application.

Upon approval of your application, you can schedule your exam with PSI if it is required for your license type. The examinations will be answered using a computer and you must get a minimum score of 70% in each exam to pass. The type of exam, as well as the topics covered, will depend on the license you are applying for. These exams must be answered within a specific time period, but these time limits will also vary depending on the exam. You may bring a silent, non-programmable, non-printing calculator with you, as well as allowed reference books because these are open book exams.

All license applicants are required to take the Business and Law exam. They can also bring this reference material with them:

  • Contractors Guide to Business, Law and Project Management, Connecticut, 5th Edition, by the National Association of State Contractors Licensing Agencies (NASCLA)

Other instructions regarding the license application process may be found here: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/occpro/Application-instructions-document-3-27-18.pdf?la=en.

Home Improvement Contractor Registration

Home improvement contractors are not issued licenses in Connecticut. Instead, they are required to register with the state, whether they are contracting as an individual or as a legal entity.

Both the individual and legal entity home contractor applicants are only required to completely fill out the application form and pay $220 for the application fee to be registered with the state. But if they have employees, they must also provide workers’ compensation insurance.

The application form for individual applicants is found at https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/licensing/Home-Improvement-and-NHC/HIC-Appl-Individual_18July.pdf?la=en, while legal entity applicants must use the application form located at https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/licensing/Home-Improvement-and-NHC/HIC-Appl-Company_18July.pdf?la=en if they want to submit hard copies of their application.

However, legal entity home contractor applicants are required to have the application form signed by more than 1 LLC or LLP member or corporate shareholder if he or she is representing a Limited Liability Company, Limited Liability Partner, or Corporation. Every partner must sign the form if the legal entity represents a partnership.

Registrations expire yearly on November 30. Before they expire, the Board will send out renewal notices 30-45 days prior to it to remind you to renew your registration.

New Home Construction Contractor Registration

The state of Connecticut only requires new home construction contractors to be registered only, since they do not issue licenses for this type of contractor.

Aside from online registration, you can download a copy of the application forms at https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/pdf/Applications_Added_2017/NHC-Appl-Individual_18July.pdf?la=en for sole proprietor or individual applicants and at https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/pdf/Applications_Added_2017/NHC-Appl-Company_18July.pdf?la=en for legal entities. Legal entities require that the signatories in the application form are all the partners if applying as a partnership or at least 1 LLP or LLC member or corporate shareholder if the applicant is a Limited Liability Partnership, Limited Liability Company, or a Corporation.

Registering for this category also only requires you to completely fill out the necessary application form and pay the registration fee, which depends if you or the legal entity are also registered in Connecticut as a home improvement contractor and holding a valid registration. However, if you are also applying for the home improvement contractor registration at the same time or are already registered as a home improvement contractor, you will need to pay into the state’s New Home Construction Guaranty Fund instead of paying for the registration fee. If applying under the same name either as an individual or sole proprietor or a legal entity, you must pay $480 if you have a valid home improvement contractor registration issued by the state and $720 if you do not have it.

This registration expires biennially, specifically September 30 of every odd-number years. It costs $720 to renew your registration.

Major Contractor Registration

Those who are classified by the state of Georgia as major contractors must also apply for registration in the state of Georgia. The same application form applies to both individual and legal entity applicants, and this can be found here: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/occpro/forms/MCO-01_17Oct-pdf.pdf?la=en if you are not applying online.

Aside from filling out this application form, you must also submit the following, which should not be more than 30 days old by the time you file your application:

  • A credit reference letter from a bank or any other financial institution
  • A credit reference letter that comes from a subcontractor or supplier from the related industry
  • Proof that you have a general liability insurance and that it names the ‘Department of Consumer Protection, 450 Columbus Blvd, Ste 901, Hartford CT 06103’ as the certificate holder
  • Three reference letters made by individuals who are familiar with your abilities, skills, and knowledge in relation to your performance when it comes to major contracting activities

These requirements, if applicable to you, should also be submitted:

  • For domestic LLC or corporations, you must submit proof of your legal existence from Connecticut’s Secretary of State that is less than 30 days old
  • Foreign LLC or corporations must also submit proof their proof of legal existence from the state where they are incorporated, together with your certificate of good standing from Connecticut’s Secretary of State and must also not be more than 30 days old
  • List of construction projects in the past, as well as those completed in the last 5 years

You must pay the $500 application fee when you submit your application. Make sure that your application form has been notarized before you submit your application form.

Registrations for major contractors expire yearly, specifically every June 30.

Mechanical Contractor Registration

The state of Connecticut also requires mechanical contractors to be registered, specifically if they have 10 or more licensed employees to do the work. To do so, you must file your application either online or download this form and fill it out: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/occpro/forms/MECapppdf.pdf?la=en. Have your application form signed by a Notary Public and pay the application fee of $110.

When registered, take note that it expires on August 31 each year.

Electrical License

Two general categories of electricians are required to be licensed in the state of Connecticut, and these are the electrical contractors and electrical journeyperson. Each of them also has sub-categories, this is why the state has different categories in terms of electrician licenses, although the application only focuses on the two general categories.

The application form for both the electrical contractor and electrical journeyperson license can be downloaded at http://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=56&bulletinurl=.pdf.

All types of electrical licenses expire yearly on September 30.

Crane and Conveyor License

The application form for this license, as well as information about the exams, can be found here: https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=1&bulletinurl=.pdf.

Plumbing and Pipefitting Licenses

Contractors and journeyperson under this trade are also required to obtain the state-issued licenses before working in Connecticut. The application packet can be downloaded at http://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=61&bulletinurl=.pdf.

Elevator Work Licenses

In the state of Connecticut, elevator trainees, journeypersons, and contractors are all required to obtain licenses. You can download the application packet for this license at http://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=57&bulletinurl=.pdf.

For elevator trainees, you must use this application packet: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/pdf/applications_added_2014/APPLICATIONATRAINEEREGISTRATIONDCPFINALREV08142013pdf.pdf?la=en. Note that you do not need to take an exam to be an elevator trainee.

Residential stair lift technicians and trainees are only required to register with the state; they do not need to pass any exam. To do so, they must fill out the forms here: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/occpro/forms/ResidentialStairLiftApprenticeTraineeRegistrationpdf.pdf?la=en for residential stair lift trainees and https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/occpro/forms/ResidentialStairLiftLicenseApplicationELVRLS01pdf.pdf?la=en for residential stair lift technicians.

Heating and Cooling Work License

Journeypersons and contractors that will do heating and cooling works within the state of Connecticut must obtain their respective licenses from the state. Applicants under this occupational trade may download the application packet at http://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=59&bulletinurl=.pdf.

Note that the application packets for the heating and cooling work, sheet metal work, and hearth product work or fuel gas work licenses are the same.

Sheet Metal Work License

Sheet metal work contractors and journeypersons are also required to obtain licenses from the state before working anywhere in Connecticut. The application packet for both contractors and journeypersons may be obtained here: https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=63&bulletinurl=.pdf.

Hearth Product Work/Fuel Gas Work License

The state of Connecticut requires that contractors and journeypersons in the hearth product work or fuel gas work be licensed before they can practice their trade anywhere in the state. You must completely fill out the application form found in this packet: https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=312&bulletinurl=.pdf.

Fire Protection Work License

Connecticut classifies fire protection licenses into fire protection sprinkler contractors, journeypersons, and layout technicians, with all of them required to be licensed by the state. You can apply as a contractor or journeyperson under this trade by completing this application packet: https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=58&bulletinurl=.pdf.

If you are applying as a layout technician, you must take note of the requirements and instructions stated here: https://portal.ct.gov/DCP/License-Services-Division/All-License-Applications/Application-Instructions-for-Automatic-Fire-Sprinkler-System-Layout-Technician. To be issued this license, you must submit either a current copy of your card or a verified certification of the NICET Level III in the fire protection field, which must be issued by the National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies. Since you are not required to take an exam, you only need to pay the application fee of $75 for this license, as well as the initial license fee if your application has been approved.

Spa and Pool Work License

Also required to be licensed in the state of Connecticut are journeypersons and contractors doing spa and swimming pool work. The application forms for these, including the examination instructions and other related information, can be found here https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=54&bulletinurl=.pdf.

However, those who will be assembling or installing above ground spas and swimming pools must register as a home improvement contractor in the state; there is no need for them to obtain a license. They must only do so if they will do repairs and maintenance work on these above ground spas and swimming pools.

Well Drilling License

Well drillers, particularly both journeypersons and contractors, are also mandated by the state of Connecticut to be licensed first. Its application packet can be found here: https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=62&bulletinurl=.pdf. Licenses under this classification expire on April 30 every year.

Glass Work License

Contractors and Journeypersons working with glass, specifically flat glass, should also acquire licenses in Connecticut. Their application packets can be found at this website: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/pdf/applications_added_2014/glazinglicensingapplicationpdf20081pdf.pdf?la=en. Glazier licenses annually expire on August 31.

Home Inspection License

If you want to focus on inspecting homes, you should know that the state of Connecticut only allows people to do so if they have the license for it. Inspectors themselves must get licensed, while the home inspector interns are only required to obtain permits. Application packets for those interested can be downloaded at this website: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/occpro/forms/appHOIHOPpdf.pdf?la=en. Only those applying for the license are required to take and pass the exams. This type of license expires every June 30 during odd years.

The application fee for the home inspector license is $40, while the home inspector intern permit application fee is $20. If granted, you must pay either $250 for the initial fee of your home inspector license or $200 for your home inspector intern permit.

Irrigation Work License

Connecticut also requires that those who will do work related to irrigation systems be licensed. This applies to both contractors and journeypersons. To apply for this license, download the application form from https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=53&bulletinurl=.pdf.

Solar Energy Work License

If you plan to work on projects or contracts in the state that are related to solar energy, make sure to get yourself licensed first before doing so. To do that, check their application packet at https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=52&bulletinurl=.pdf and fill out the necessary forms.

For solar thermal contractor or journeyperson certificate program applicants, they are only required to take the trade knowledge exam. However, they must already have the following licenses before filing their applications: P-2, P-4, S-2, and S-4 for journeyperson applicants and P-1, P-3, S-1, and S-3 for contractors. The applicants must include photocopies of their current P or S licenses, as well as proof that they completed a Department of Consumer Protection-approved solar thermal installation certificate training course, in their application.

Signs and Outline Lighting License

The application packet for this license may be accessed at https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=52&bulletinurl=.pdf. Those contractors and journeypersons who would be working on electrical signs are required by the state to be duly licensed.

Welding, Valves, and Machinist Work License

Contractors and journeypersons who would take part in contracts or projects involving welding and heating and cooling valves need to be licensed before doing so. You can check out the application packet for this license at https://candidate.psiexams.com/bulletin/display_bulletin.jsp?ro=yes&actionname=83&bulletinid=331&bulletinurl=.pdf.

Additional requirements for the G-8 and G-9 licenses include acquiring either of the welder qualifications listed below:

  • 2 in. – 6 in. dia. Schedule 40 – Schedule 180, A53 carbon steel pipe, open root in 6G position, 37 1⁄2 degree bevel using the GTAW process, specifically either Root: E705-2, Fill: E-7018 or Root: E705-2, Fill: E70-5-2, to all the requirements of the ASME Boiler Code Section’s IX. You can also substitute Section IX of the ASME Boiler Code with CRES 304, 308 and 309 (stainless), or
  • 6” dia. Schedule 40 – Schedule 120, A53 carbon steel pipe, open root in 6G position, 37 1⁄2 degree bevel that uses the SMAW process (Root: E-6010, Fill: E-7018)

These qualifications must be obtained not more than 6 months before applying for your license.

The Advantages of Being Registered or Licensed

People nowadays are becoming smart when it comes to stuff that they know they are required to shell out a significant amount of money on. Many prefer to spend a bit more if they know that they are going to get their money’s worth, instead of going after what is cheaper but comes with no guarantees.

This mindset is why many are turning towards hiring registered or licensed contractors, even in the state of Connecticut. This brought on the demand for hiring contractors that hold valid licenses or registrations. Clients know that they would get their money’s worth and that they are assured that the contractors they get really do know the trade. Contractors who had to pay various fees to obtain their licenses and registrations easily get their money’s worth, since the demand for them is high.

These contractors also have the right to charge higher prices compared to unlicensed ones, since they have sufficient proof to back up their skills to their clients.

The state of Connecticut also fines those who work as contractors but do not possess the necessary registration or license. For those who would be caught, they may be subjected to fines that can cost as much as $1,500, or even be charged and imprisoned. This is why it is important that you register or get licensed if you plan to do some contracting work in the state.

Contractor License Search and Lookup

The most convenient way to check if a contractor is licensed is through the online database of the state of Connecticut. This database can be found at https://www.elicense.ct.gov/. You can search specific licensees at that website, which also provides you rosters of registered contractors. That database includes everything from general contractors, electrical, home improvement, plumbing, HVAC and is the place where you need to go to lookup a contractor license in Connecticut.

You can also send them an email at dcp.online@ct.gov.

The Importance of Hiring a Contractor with a License

Peace of mind should be a priority when dealing with construction work. Nobody wants a house or any structure that might crumble easily after spending some money on it. This is the risk anyone takes when hiring unlicensed contractors. If you hire unlicensed or unregistered contractors, there is no guarantee that they will be able to get the job done well enough to last for years.

This is the main reason why the state of Connecticut established the Home Improvement Act and has a Home Guarantee Fund to protect homeowners in relation to work done by licensed and registered contractors. This fund was established so that clients who are unsatisfied with the work of contractors and have an unpaid court judgment may recover damages as much as $15,000. This protects clients who ask for damages through the courts but the contractors they hired are not financially capable of doing so. You can find the full information about it here: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/pdf/factsheets/2013guarantyfundfactsheetpdf.pdf?la=en

Contractor License Classifications

The state of Connecticut is quite strict when it comes to trade regulations, this is why they have more than the usual number of license types that are related to construction work. These different license classifications also have sub-categories, this is why it is important that you make sure that you are applying for the correct license type that is applicable to your trade.

General Contractor License

Connecticut does not as such have a license for general contractors, although the work that is done by such a professional is covered by some of the different license types you can read about below. As such, if that is the type of work you are looking to do, find the most relevant categories given your professional curiosity.

Home Improvement Contractor License

Home improvement contractors, as defined by the state, are those that do work on an existing residential property that results in permanent changes to it. This includes garages, swimming pools, porches, insulation, waterproofing, painting, driveways, landscaping, and many others.

You need to be registered in the state as one if you will be working on residential properties that have single or multiple family dwellings that are less than six units or if your rate when it comes to home improvement contracts during any 12 consecutive months is a minimum of $1,000. More information about it, including the state’s regulations, can be found here: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DCP/Investigations-Division/documents/FinalHomeImprovementGuidepdf.pdf?la=en.

New Home Construction Contractor

If you intend to build a new house, or intend to sell a house prior to it being occupied, you are required to be a registered new home construction contractor in the state of Connecticut. However, this will not apply to you if you are a licensed realtor and engaging in real estate work covered by chapter 392, dealer or licensee of mobile homes that fall under chapter 412, holding an occupational or professional license and practicing in the field you are licensed under, and a new home construction contractor engaging in single or multiple contracts that are related to the same new home, which has an aggregate value not exceeding $3,500.

Major Contractor

Major contractors are allowed by the state to engage in construction work that go beyond the threshold limits set by the state, which are four stories high or 60 feet in height, 150 feet in width and with a clear span, 150,000 square feet of the total gross area, or an occupancy of up to 1000 people. Its full scope can be found at https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_541.htm#sec_29-276b.

You are also considered as a major contractor if you will be under the supervision of a general contractor in working on projects that affect a structure or building’s structural integrity, including the addition, repair, demolition, or alteration. This includes masonry and roofing activities, as well as structural frame work.

The rules of the state regarding major contractors are uploaded at https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_393c.htm.

Mechanical Contractor

Registered mechanical contractors are only allowed by the state to offer the services of their employees to the public, specifically in terms of heating, piping, and cooling work and plumbing and piping work covered under chapter 393, which is listed here in detail: https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_393.htm. They employ licensed employees that will do the aforementioned work; mechanical contractors cannot do the work themselves. Note that mechanical contractors are different from licensees that can work on plumbing and piping work and heating, piping, and cooling work in the state.

Electrical Work

In general, those who hold valid electricians’ licenses in the state are allowed to engage in the maintenance and repair, installation, alteration, and erection of cables, wires, busways, insulators, conduits, apparatuses, supports, appliances, equipment, or fixtures that make use of electrical energy, with the exception of low voltage wirings that are used with lawn sprinkler systems.

If you will be engaging in electrical work in the state, note that there are ten different electrical license classifications available. In particular, these are:

  • C-5 limited electrical contractor – only permitted to work on audio and sound systems, telephone-interconnect, and alarm or signal work. These must be considered low voltage, specifically not exceeding 8 amperes or 48 volts for every system.
  • C-6 limited electrical journeyperson – has the same work coverage as that of a C-5 limited electrical contractor but they are required to work as an employee of a licensed electrical contractor
  • E-1 unlimited electrical contractor – allowed to do all kinds of electrical work that are defined under Connecticut’s General Statutes section 20-330, which can be found at https://law.justia.com/codes/connecticut/2011/title20/chap393/Sec20-330.html
  • E-2 unlimited electrical journeyperson – also has the same limits as that of an unlimited electrical contractor but they must only work under the supervision of a licensed contractor.
  • L-1 electrical lines contractor – is limited to working on the maintenance, repair, and installation of all high-voltage cable splicing and pulling wire for all systems that have more than 2,400 volts and highway lightings and traffic signals, as well as the line construction and related work for both private and public companies, including its distribution systems.
  • L-2 electrical lines journeyperson – can do the same kind of work as an electrical lines contractor but only when supervised by a licensed electrical lines contractor
  • L-5 limited electrical contractor – has the same coverage as that of the C-5 limited electrical contractor, but the system’s voltage must not be more 5 amperes or 25 volts
  • L-6 limited electrical journeyperson – must be under the employment of a licensed electrical contractor before the or she can do the same kind of work as that of an L-5 limited electrical contractor
  • T-1 limited electrical contractor – only allowed to work on telephone-interconnect systems
  • T-2 limited electrical journeyperson – must be supervised by a T-1 limited electrical contractor before he or she can work on telephone-interconnect systems only

Crane and Conveyor Work

There are four different classifications under the crane and conveyor license, and these are:

  • R-7 limited conveyor contractor – can only work on fixed or machines or apparatus that can be used in conveying materials, excluding freight elevators. You can install or do maintenance and repair work on these, whether they are in a permanent location or not
  • R-8 limited conveyor journeyperson – can do the same kind of work as that of an R-7 limited conveyor contractor but only if employed by a licensed contractor
  • R-9 limited hoists, cranes, and lifts – can do maintenance and repair work, as well as the installation of any machine or apparatus that can lift or hoist materials, such as under hung cranes, monorails, double girder cranes, and top running single girder cranes with under hung hoists.
  • R-10 limited hoists, cranes, and lifts journeypersons – has the same work scope as that of an R-9 limited hoists, cranes, and lifts but he or she is required to work under the guidance of a licensed contractor

Plumbing and Pipefitting Work

Ten different license classifications are available for plumbers and pipefitters, and these are:

  • J-1 limited contractor – can only work on water conditioning and domestic pumps
  • J-2 limited well pumps and piping journeyperson – has the same limitations as that of a J-1 limited contractor and is also required to be employed by a licensed contractor
  • P-1 unlimited plumbing contractor – allowed to work on all of piping and plumbing works, as enumerated in the General Statutes of Connecticut, section 20-330, which you can view at https://law.justia.com/codes/connecticut/2011/title20/chap393/Sec20-330.html
  • P-2 unlimited journeyperson – also permitted to work on all piping and plumbing works, but only if supervised by a licensed contractor
  • P-6 limited sewer, storm, and water journeyperson – if supervised by a licensed contractor, a journeyperson under this category is allowed to work on pipes in relation to water, storm, and sewer lines, which from a point of utility responsibility, up to a point somewhere inside a structure
  • P-7 limited sewer, storm, and water contractor – similar to the role of a P-6 limited sewer, storm, and water journeyperson but allowed to work independently
  • P-8 limited gasoline tank, piping, and pump journeyperson – under the tutelage of a licensed contractor, the journeyperson can work on the piping of petroleum tanks and pumping equipment related to it
  • P-9 limited gasoline tank, piping, and pump contractor – can also work on petroleum tanks’ piping and its related pumping equipment, but can do so independently
  • W-8 limited drainlayer journeyperson – those with this license, under the supervision of a contractor with a valid license, are permitted to work on the piping of sanitary and/or storm lines only
  • W-9 limited drainlayer contractor – while similar in scope with a W-8 limited drainlayer journeyperson, those with this license are permitted to work alone

Elevator Work

There are four license types available in the state when it comes to working with elevators:

  • R-1 unlimited elevator contractor – can take on all of the installation and maintenance and repair works that are related to elevators, as mentioned in section 20-330 of the General Statutes of the state of Connecticut, which can be found here: https://law.justia.com/codes/connecticut/2011/title20/chap393/Sec20-330.html
  • R-2 unlimited journeyperson elevator – is similar to an R-1 unlimited elevator contractor but he or she must be employed by a licensed contractor
  • R-5 accessibility contractor – must only work on accessibility equipment, such as inclined lifts, inclined stairway chairlifts, vertical wheelchair lifts, and other similar equipment that is used for transporting persons with disabilities, particularly those with mobility issues and may or may not need wheelchairs.
  • R-6 accessibility journeyperson – may also work on different accessibility equipment but he or she must be supervised by a licensed contractor
  • Residential stair lift technician – allowed to install, maintain, repair, or alter stair lifts, which are residential chair lifts with a fixed single swivel seat that is installed in the stairway of a private home, but they are not allowed to do cosmetic or non-structural work on them

Heating and Cooling Work

For contractors and journeypersons who will work on heating and cooling works, including its installation, repair, maintenance, replacement, or alteration, these are the available types of licenses:

  • B-1 limited gas and oil burner contractor – can only work on gas or oil burners that consume a maximum of five gallons per hour. This includes the maintenance, repair, and installation in both domestic and light commercial settings
  • B-2 limited gas and oil burner journeyperson – has the same limitations as that of a B-1 limited gas and oil burner contractor but is required to be under the guidance of a licensed contractor
  • B-3 limited gas and oil contractor – allowed to work on all types of gas and oil fired burners
  • B-4 limited gas and oil journeyperson – may also work on all the different kinds of gas and oil fired burners but they can only do so if employed by a licensed contractor
  • BM-1 boiler maker contractor (power industry license) – allows you to install, repair, alter, erect, or replace inlet air systems and exhausts on electric generation facilities
  • BM-2 boiler maker journeyperson – has the same allowed work as that of a BM-1 boiler maker contractor but is restricted to working with a licensed contractor
  • D-1 limited warm air, air conditioning, and refrigeration system contractor – are not allowed to work on oil burners but he or she can work on systems that involve air conditioning, warm air, and refrigeration
  • D-2 limited warm air, air conditioning, and refrigeration system journeyperson – can work on the same scope as that of a D-1 limited warm air, air conditioning, and refrigeration system contractor but only when supervised by a licensed contractor
  • D-3 limited heating-cooling contractor – can only work on refrigeration systems related to air conditioning, special process systems, and food storage
  • D-4 limited heating-cooling journeyperson – is similar to a D-3 limited heating-cooling contractor but requires the supervision of a licensed contractor
  • S-1 unlimited heating, piping, and cooling contractor – are allowed to do all kinds of work related to heating, piping, and cooling, which are mentioned in the General Statutes of the state, specifically in section 20-330. You can read it in full at https://law.justia.com/codes/connecticut/2011/title20/chap393/Sec20-330.html
  • S-2 unlimited heating, piping, and cooling journeyperson – can also do all kinds of heating, piping, and cooling-related work but only when guided by a licensed contractor
  • S-3 limited heating, piping, and cooling contractor – limited to working on air conditioning systems, specifically its steam piping, installing hot, chilled, and condenser water, installation and servicing of oil burners but not including the refrigeration and air conditioning systems, and sheet metal work, and installation, alteration, and maintenance of the appliances, piping, accessories, or devices for heating systems
  • S-4 limited heating, piping, and cooling journeyperson – similar in scope to an S-3 limited heating, piping, and cooling contractor but must be overseen by a licensed contractor
  • S-5 limited heating, hot water, and steam contractor – only allowed to working on steam heating or hot water systems that have a maximum heating load of 500,000 BTU, as well as a maximum steam pressure of 15 pounds, in buildings that have a maximum height of three stories. It does not include working with oil burners regardless of size
  • S-6 limited heating, hot water, and steam journeyperson – is the same in terms of the scope of work of an S-5 limited heating, hot water, and steam contractor, but must be under the supervision of a licensed contractor
  • S-7 limited contractor – similar to the S-5 limited heating, hot water, and steam contractor but he or she is allowed to work on oil burners that can handle up to 5 gallons in an hour, gas piping, and gas burners
  • S-8 limited journeyperson – can work on the same projects handled by an S-7 limited contractor but must be an employee of a licensed contractor
  • S-9 limited heating cooling contractor – has the same scope of work as that of an S-7 limited contractor but also includes working on cooling installations of a maximum of 35 tons in each system, as well as LP gas that come from natural gas piping and/or gas containers
  • S-10 limited heating cooling journeyperson – under the supervision of a licensed contractor, he or she can do the same work scope of an S-9 limited heating cooling contractor

Sheet Metal Work

If you are working with sheet metals, your license may be classified as one of the following:

  • SM-1 limited sheet metal contractor – can work on ferrous and nonferrous ductwork systems regardless of size and type, except for pneumatic conveyance systems
  • SM-2 limited sheet metal journeyperson – required to work as an employee of a licensed contractor but he or she has the same scope of work as that of an SM-1 limited sheet metal contractor
  • SM-3 limited sheet metal residential/light commercial contractor – also shares the same work scope with an SM-1 limited sheet metal contractor but he or she can only do the work in either a residential and/or light commercial setting
  • SM-4 limited sheet metal residential/light commercial journeyperson – must be supervised by a licensed contractor when working on projects that has the similar scope as that of an SM-3 limited sheet metal residential/light commercial contractor
  • SM-5 limited sheet metal contractor hood systems – can only work on any type and size of hood ductwork systems, both nonferrous and ferrous ones, following the state’s proscribed code standards
  • SM-6 limited sheet metal journeyperson hood systems – required to be an employee of a licensed contractor when doing the same scope of work as that of an SM-5 limited sheet metal contractor hood systems

Hearth Product Work/Fuel Gas Work

Only two classifications are present for the hearth product work/fuel gas work:

  • HPG-1 contractor – includes working on hearth product work, namely natural gas or propane powered fireplace, stove or log set, fireplace insert, or venting and piping that imitates a flame of a solid fuel fire, as well as certain gas hearth product work
  • HPG-2 journeyperson – covers the same scope of work as that of an HPG-1 contractor but needs to be overseen by a licensed contractor.

Fire Protection Work

Contractors and journeypersons under this licensed are classified as:

  • F-1 unlimited fire protection sprinkler contractor’s license – can work on all types of fire protection sprinkler systems defined by the state, as mentioned in section 20-330 of the General Statutes: https://law.justia.com/codes/connecticut/2011/title20/chap393/Sec20-330.html
  • F-2 unlimited fire protection sprinkler journeyperson’s license – shares the same scope of work with an F-1 unlimited fire protection sprinkler contractor but is required to be managed by a licensed contractor
  • F-3 limited fire protection contractor’s license – is restricted to working on halon and other gas or liquid fire suppression systems, special hazard systems such as foam, water spray, dry chemical, or carbon dioxide systems, and foam extinguishing systems
  • F-4 limited fire protection journeyperson’s license – is required to work on the same scope as that of an F-3 limited fire protection contractor and supervised by a licensed contractor

Spa and Pool Work

Those doing construction work related to spas and swimming pools are required to obtain the following applicable licenses:

  • SP-1 limited spa and pool contractor – allowed to work on hot tubs, swimming pools, spas, and other similar therapeutic or recreational equipment, including their repair and maintenance that includes plumbing, electrical, and heating works, but he or she is not subjected to the provisions written in chapter 400 of the General Statutes of the state
  • SP-2 limited spa and pool journeyperson – required to be employed by a licensed contractor and shares the same scope of work with an SP-1 limited spa and pool contractor
  • SPB swimming pool builder contractor – for those installing in ground swimming pools that have depths of more than 24 inches

Well Drilling

Well drilling contractors and journeypersons for both water and non-water wells must also secure their licenses from the state. They may choose what applies to them from the list below:

  • W-1 limited water well contractor – permitted to install wells, as well as install and do maintenance and repair works of pump piping, pump motors, pumps, tanks, electronic controls, wiring, and valves
  • W-2 limited water well journeyperson – covers the same work as that of a W-1 limited water well contractor but is required to be supervised by a licensed contractor
  • W-3 limited non-water or monitoring well contractor – also has the same work scope as that of a W-1 limited water well contractor but can only work on non-water or monitoring wells
  • W-4 limited non-water or monitoring well journeyperson – must also be employed by a licensed W-3 limited non-water or monitoring well contractor before being allowed to work on the same kind of work as the contractor
  • W-5 well casing extension contractor – can perform piping and plumbing work related to the maintenance and repair and extension of well casings
  • W-6 well casing extension journeyperson – may also work on well casings but needs to be employed by a W-5 well casing extension contractor

Glass Work License

The glass work license in Connecticut covers both automotive glass and flat glass, which is typical for construction work. But for flat glass work, licenses are classified under either a contractor or journeyperson only:

  • FG-1 unlimited contractor’s license for flat glass work – allows the licensee to work on both commercial and residential structures in terms of installing and maintenance works on glass
  • FG-2 unlimited journeyperson’s license for flat glass work – must be an employee of a licensed FG-1 unlimited contractor before working on the installation or other maintenance work involving glass in either residential or commercial structures.

Home Inspection

Home inspectors also need to get themselves licensed before working anywhere in the state. Their scope of work involves examining and writing evaluations of at least one specific component of any residential building.

Irrigation Work

In Connecticut, irrigation work licenses focus on lawn sprinkler systems and are classified into contractors and journeypersons only:

  • J-3 limited lawn sprinkler contractor #– may install, repair, alter, replace or do maintenance work on lawn sprinkler systems
  • J-4 limited lawn sprinkler journeyperson – can also do the work of a J-3 contractor with a license but should also be employed by one in order to do so.

Solar Energy Work

Journeypersons and contractors that will be involved in the solar energy trade are also required to get themselves licensed by the state. Found below are the license classifications available:

  • ST-1 solar thermal contractor – can only work on any solar thermal work systems that are able to convert ambient energy directly into heat or store the ambient energy
  • ST-2 solar thermal limited journeyperson – must also only work on solar thermal works systems but is also required to be an employee of a licensed ST-1 solar thermal contractor
  • STC-1 solar thermal contractor – similar to an ST-1 solar thermal contractor but has completed the requirements of the certificate program
  • STC-2 solar thermal limited journeyperson – also required to complete the state’s certificate program before
  • PV-1 limited solar electric contractor – only allowed to work on solar electric systems, specifically wind and photovoltaic generation systems
  • PV-2 limited solar electric journeyperson – required to be under the employment of a licensed PV-1 contractor before working on solar electric systems

Signs and Outline Lighting

Contractors and journeypersons working with electric signs in the state must also obtain their respective licenses:

  • C-7 limited electrical sign contractor – can install, repair, service, test, and maintain electric signs, as long as it is done at a dedicated connection or outlet receptacle that is directly adjacent to the electric sign
  • C-8 limited electrical sign journeyperson – also does the same work but must be an employee of a C-7 limited electrical sign contractor holding a valid license

Welding, Valves, and Machinist Work License

In the state of Connecticut, those contractors and journeypersons who will engage in this trade must also get their respective licenses, which may be one or more of the following:

  • G-8 limited welding journeyperson – can only work on pipes and pipe-associated fittings that are used by licensed individuals indicated in chapter 393 of the General Statutes of the state and that they will be using these materials to do work as licensed individuals indicated in the statute’s section 20-330. They can only do the work if they are employed by a licensed contractor
  • G-9 limited welding contractor – same in scope with a licensed G-8 journeyperson but works independently
  • MT-1 limited heating cooling contractor – only allowed to work on permanent plant equipment machining activities, including form tool and single point, pipe prepping, machine milling flange facing, pipe cut off and prepping, counter boring, metal disintegrating maching, CNC pipe prepping/machining, machine boring, grinding, tapping, and threading, and electrical discharge maching, in fossil, petrochemical, or nuclear facilities
  • MT-2 limited heating cooling contractor – has the same limitations of an MT-1 limited heating cooling contractor but is required to be under the supervision of one
  • V-1 limited heating and cooling contractor (valves) – can work with all types and classes of valves, specifically in terms of assembly and disassembly, installation, repair, replacement, and maintenance
  • V-2 limited heating and cooling journeyperson (valves) – may do the same kind of work of a V-1 limited heating and cooling contractor, as long as he or she is under the employ of one

Biggest Cities

The cities and counties of the state of Connecticut, including Bridgeport, New Haven, Stamford, Hartford, Waterbury, Norwalk, Danbury, New Britain, West Hartford, and Bristol, generally follow the state’s regulations when it comes to issuing contractor licenses, as well as licenses for other skilled trade. However, certain cities also require additional contractor licensing for certain skilled work.

City of New Haven

Aside from the state-issued licenses, the city of New Haven also requires licenses to be obtained by those who will be involved in both excavation and sidewalk works. Note that excavation licenses are separate from sidewalk licenses, but they have the same requirements. To obtain one, you must accomplish the following:

  • Filled-out application form that also includes an up-to-date company information
  • For new applicants, copies of their state-issued license
  • Certificate of Liability Insurance that names the ‘City of New Haven’ as an additional insured
  • Excavation and/or sidewalk bond amounting to $10,000 each. As mandated by an ordinance of the city, these bonds should be an original bond only and is required to be held for 3 years

Fees for the licenses are $240 for the excavation license, which expires every April 1, and $350 for the sidewalk license that also expires every December 31. Applications must be submitted to the following address:

Building Department – Permit & License Center

200 Orange Street, Room 501
New Haven, CT 06510

City of Bristol

The city of Bristol also requires that contractors doing excavation work must be licensed first by the state. To do so, they must meet the following requirements:

  • Valid license holder of either a P-1, P-7, or W-9 license that has been issued by the state of Connecticut
  • Filled-out Excavation Contractor’s License Application form, which you can obtain from the Bristol Public Works Department
  • $10,000 bond, including a Power of Attorney form
  • Certificate of Liability Insurance for personal injury with a minimum coverage of $100,000, as well as for property damage with a coverage of $10,000 at minimum

Your application must be submitted to the office of the Bristol Department of Public Works.

Contractor’s License Reciprocity

Whenever available, contractor license reciprocity agreements between states allows you acquire the same kind of license in those states with reciprocity agreements, as long as you have fulfilled the requirements and have taken and passed the qualifying exam in one of those states. To be precise, if you obtained your license from State A, which has a contractor license reciprocity agreement with State B, you can also obtain the same kind of license you got in State A as long as you complete State B’s requirements. Note that acquiring licenses through reciprocity agreements are normally much easier because the requirements are lesser compared to obtaining one from scratch.

Unfortunately, the state of Connecticut does not have any contractor license reciprocity agreement with any other state, despite the fact that it regulates quite a number of contractor licenses and licenses for skilled work. You will have to obtain your license from another state as a new applicant.